Himalayas 2.0

Bhutan 2017

I always think it’s interesting to look back to the moment when I choose a new country to visit. With Bhutan, I remember vividly the moment I read about the Druk Path Trek, and discovered trekking options in the eastern Himalayas. It was rainy September day, and I was waiting excitedly for our upcoming trip to New Zealand. I was reading Lonely Planet’s 1000 Ultimate Adventures. Best Treks with Killer Views? Sign me up!

“From bucolic blue pine, fir and thick alpine forests and dwarfed rhododendron trees to sparkling lakes and steep valleys nestled beneath Himalayan peaks, the landscape simultaneously feeds the soul and makes the camera happy …yet the subtle beauty of nomadic yak herders you pass while gliding through high-altitude meadows is just as stunning as the dramatic terrain.” – p72. 1st edition.

I had heard of Bhutan before. My partner’s mother had travelled there a few years ago with her Buddhist teacher and was able to visit both east and west Bhutan. In the three weeks she was there, she was able to experience a very different side of Asia. Mesmerizing prayer flags, high Himalayan peaks, and friendly people… I was very intrigued! Over the years, she has extensively travelled around Central and Southern Asia, and her opinion weighted heavy on my mind. It had been life changing.

I spent a few weeks researching activities in Bhutan, as I am the more active type, and discovered there was quite a few different options in regards to treks and ‘adventure’ sports. I liked the idea of possibly rafting or biking in Bhutan but did find it challenging to source credible reviews on actitivies. Throughout my research, I had to keep a very open mind at this point in regards to price, as any activities outside of the daily ‘normal sightseeing’ tour incurred an extra fee.

I had decided early on that I would prefer a longer trek. While in Nepal a few years ago, the 12 days we took for the Annapurna Base Camp was extremely rewarding. Wanting something a little more challenging, I choose the Jomolhari Laya Gasa Trek. Although based in western Bhutan (the side known to be more developed), the trek will take me high into the Bhutanese Himalayas and into rural mountain living. Having my introduction in Nepal, I’m throughly excited to experience this culture again.


Once in a Lifetime.

I’ve always been a believer of fate. Things happening because they should, and occurring at the most influential time. Whether good or bad, we learn from each experience and those to come.

When the opportunity arose to visit Bhutan, I knew this would be one of few countries that I ‘very likely’ would not be returning to. When I spoke to my partner’s mum about this notion, she agreed. Even if it was primarily due to funds, my goal was to know make the most of this trip. Jam-packed, adventure-filled Bhutanese fun.

When I emailed Raven Tours and Treks, I had listed a few activities that I would like to do while in Bhutan. I had sent the same email to a few other companies (honestly, I think the top 3 on TripAdvisior :P) and the manager wrote me back within a few hours saying he would put something together for me. The promptness won me over immediately. Within a few weeks we had a rough plan, including some cycle tours and a two days drive to the Gantey Monastery. The flexibility and eagerness to help and answer my questions only instilled my choice with this tour company. In the proceeding weeks, only one other company had replied to my email. Something of the more genetic type. Did it matter? My 6 day trip had been upgraded to a 2 week adventure!


Travel is never a matter of money but of courage. – Coelho.

In recent weeks I have certainly heard most of them…how much will it all cost? Isn’t the visa expensive? Don’t you need a guide? Don’t you have to pay a lot? Isn’t it closed to everyone? Until I did my own research, I didn’t know myself.

I think spending 1000USD on a handbag is a lot. It doesn’t make you a better person, you don’t learn from it. 500 on a weekend in the city to purchase material objects for your wardrobe doesn’t change you as a person. 3000USD computer? 250USD jeans? 15000USD diamond ring? It’s perspective.

Travel teaches first hand experiences that one can’t get from a book. Whether is the mental growth in a surprising situation, communicating without common language, or meeting other fellow travellers with different stories to share, travelling does change people. For me, I am probably comfortable spending more on these ‘experiences’ than some others.

With that in mind, Tourism is the income in Bhutan. They don’t have a massive capitalistic, exporting/importing economy like other countries. Tourism has been developed to support the country and economy.

Depending on the time of year in which you visit, the “daily rate” can vary between $200USD (buffer season) and $250USD (high season). Including the $65 ‘Royalty Fee’ (supporting the free medical system, free education, and infrastructure), the daily rate supports a full board travel experience. Meals, Hotels, A Driver and Guide are all included. In my case for the trek, Porters, Cooks etc are also included. Raven Tours and Treks also organised the Bike Tour costs, Visa and my flight from Delhi to Paro (with Druk Airlines). Other then my flight to Delhi, there wasn’t much left to organise! Definitely a different style of travelling for me!


Adventures are the best way to Learn.

With the 30 day countdown on, the excitement is real. I get to head back to Asia, a place I have come to love over the years, and in doing so experience a new side of the region. When I was younger, I naively thought that most of Asia was similar. Same, same but different. Over the years, and getting to see different areas of Central and South Eastern Asia I have proved myself wrong! Here’s to exploring another side!

 

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